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POLAR FALCON PLATE FROM STUDERS BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA

This is an original old colored plate from the famous book on North American birds by Jacob Henry Studer (1840-1904). BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA, New York: Published under the auspices of the Natural Science Association of America, 1903. There were over 100 full-color plates in the imperial quarto volume of which this is PLATE LXXVII -- Jer-falcon, or Gyr-faloon.

This beautiful chromolithographed print measures 11 5/8” x about 14 ˝”. A little ragged along the left edge where it was detached from the volume, but otherwise the print is in quite good condition as shown in scan. Ready for framing & display.

The information that appeared in Studer’s book with this plate is as follows:
PLATE LXXVII.
Jer-falcon, or Gyr-faloon. (Falco sacer, var. candicans.)
Fig. 1 This species, a variety of the Jer-falcon-spelt also Ger and Gyr-inhabits Arctic America, North Greenland, Iceland, and Europe. Brehm says: "They appear to prefer such rocky localities as are in the immediate neighborhood of the sea-coast, and upon which hundreds and thousands of sea birds settle during the breed- ing season; nevertheless, they do not entirely avoid the wooded parts of the country, for such amongst them as are too young to pair make long excursions inland, even occasionally visiting the mountain ranges of the interior, amongst which the old birds are rarely ever seen. The attachment of these various species to their breeding places is very remarkable; they return to them with such unfailing regularity that we were once accurately directed where to look for an eyrie, even though our informant had neither seen the spot, nor heard it spoken of, for many years. In their other habits they closely resemble the Peregrine Falcon. During the summer months it subsists upon sea birds, in the winter upon Piarmigans, and, according to some naturalists, will devour hares, and live upon squirrels for whole months together. We were on one occasion for three days in the vicinity of the Nyker (two mountains much frequented by sea birds), and watched a pair of Gyr-falcons come down morning after morning punctually at ten o'clock, in order to obtain their breakfast. This was very speedily accomplished; both took a rapid survey of the, feathered swarm they were about to attack, and then, swooping down with unerring aim, carried off one bird after another, until they had obtained the necessary supply. Howell mentions having seen a Polar Falcon pounce upon two Sea Gulls at the same time, and bear them away in triumph, one in each foot. They are also said to destroy Pigeons." This species is about two feet in length. Polar, or Iceland Falcon. (Falco sacer, var. islaxdicus.) Fig. 2. Closely allied to the last-named species, and recognized as a variety, by the darker markings on the upper parts of the body. Its habits and manners are similar.

Buyer pays $5.00 postage & handling in US, plus USPS insurance.
VA residents add 5% sales tax to selling price.


Price= $45.00




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