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GOLDEN EAGLE PLATE FROM STUDERS BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA

This is an original old colored plate from the famous book on North American birds by Jacob Henry Studer (1840-1904). BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA, New York: Published under the auspices of the Natural Science Association of America, 1903. There were over 100 full-color plates in the imperial quarto volume of which this is PLATE LIX – The Golden Eagle-Ring-tailed Eagle.

This beautiful chromolithographed print measures 11 5/8” x about 14 ˝”. The left side is somewhat uneven where it was detached from the volume, but otherwise the print is in quite good condition as shown in scan. Ready for matting, framing & display.

The information that appeared in Studer’s book with this plate is as follows:

PLATE LIX.
Golden Eagle-Ring-tailed Eagle. (Aquzila canadensis.) Fig. 1.
The Golden Eagle is an inhabitant of all North America north of Mexico, of Europe, and of Asia. Its favorite haunts are in the extreme north, though it nidifies in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and in the Adirondack regions of New York. The nests are used for many years in succession, and the older they grow, the more formidable appearance do they present. A projecting shelf of rock, jutting from some inaccessible cliff, and many feet from the earth, is selected; though, when nature fails to provide such a place, tall pines or other evergreens are made to do service. A platform, from six to eight feet, is first laid, upon which a quantity of dried sticks and twigs are placed lengthwise, the interstices filled in with smaller twigs, mosses, dry grass, and over the center an extra layer of the two latter materials is evenly spread. The female is usually the architect, the male bringing the material for her use. When first constructed, the nest is small; but every year a new layer, varying from six to eighteen inches, is added, and nests more than six feet in height have been discovered. The female lays from one to three eggs, varying in size from 2.65 by 2.I5 to 3.50 by 2.50 inches. The ground color is whitish, variously spotted, speckled, and splashed with colorings that range from a rich red-brown to umber. The food consists of ducks, rabbits, mice, partridges, the fawn of deer, and other small animals. Though frequently captured, they have never been more than partially tamed, and resent with the utmost fierceness the least approach at familiarity. Cleanly in all their habits, after partaking of food they take especial pains to remove every stain of blood from their feathers. When in the act of feeding, they drop their wings, and grasping the food with the talons of either leg, tear it to pieces with their beak. The flight of the Golden Eagle is powerful, and is capable of long continuance. MacGillivray, in a poetic outburst in praise of the Golden Eagle, says that "in ten minutes he has progressed three miles;" and adds, "over the moors he sweeps at the height of two or three hundred feet, bending his course to either side, his wings wide spread, his neck and feet retracted, now beating the air, and again sailing smoothly along. Now he ascends a little, wheels in short curves, presently rushes down headlong, assumes the horizontal position when close to the ground, prevents being dashed against it by expanding his wings and tail, and grasping a poor terrified Ptarmigan that sat cowering among the gray lichens, squeezes it to death, raises his head exultingly, emits a clear shrill cry, and, springing from the ground, pursues his journey."


Buyer pays $5.00 postage & handling in US, plus USPS insurance.
VA residents add 5% sales tax to selling price.


Price= $75.00




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