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GRAY EAGLE PLATE FROM STUDERS BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA

This is an original old colored plate from the famous book on North American birds by Jacob Henry Studer (1840-1904). BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA, New York: Published under the auspices of the Natural Science Association of America, 1903. There were over 100 full-color plates in the imperial quarto volume of which this is PLATE XV – The Gray or Sea Eagle.

This beautiful chromolithographed print measures 11 5/8” x about 14 ˝”. There is a STAIN running down the center and the left side is somewhat uneven where it was detached from the volume. There are also several rather longer tears/worn areas running horizontally across the top of the print (somewhat repaired with tape on the reverse side), and a small tear on the right edge, but the print still is quite visually impressive as shown in scan. Ready for matting, framing & display.

The information that appeared in Studer’s book with this plate is as follows:

PLATE XV.
The Gray or Sea Eagle. (Ha/iaetus leucocepha/u,.)
This formidable Eagle lives in the same countries, on the same fooa, and frequents the same localities as the Bald or White-headed Eagle, with which it often associates. In fact, the Sea Eagle so much resembles the Bald Eagle, in the form of the bill, in its size, in the shape of the legs and claws, differing from the latter only in color, that it seems at once to be the same bird, distinguished from the Bald Eagles previously observed simply by its age or stage of color. Another circumstance corroborating such an inference, is the variety of the colors of Sea Eagles; scarcely any two of them are found to be colored alike, the plumage of each being more or less shaded with light color or white. On some, the chin, breast, and tail coverts are of a deep brown; on others, these parts are much lighter, sometimes whitish, with the tail evidently changing in color, and merging into white.
In former times some of the best informed ornithologists insisted that Sea Eagles must be of a different kind from Bald Eagles, as, on examination of the nests of each, it was found that both the parent Sea Eagles were different in color from the parent Bald Eagles. But it takes the Bald Eagles full four years to perfect their plumage, though the younger ones begin to breed in the second year. These young ones passing for Sea Eagles, it is supposed that there are a great many more Sea Eagles than Bald or White-headed Eagles.
Almost everybody has heard or read stories of very young children having been seized and carried off by a Bald or Sea Eagle. But it is doubtful whether any of these terror-exciting tales would bear a very close or critical examination. While the writer was stopping at an inn in the Tyrol, the landlord entered the room one afternoon in great haste, and, opening a window, discharged his short rifle at a bird that was flying at too great a distance to be even alarmed. He explained, by saying that he made it a point to kill, or at least to shoot at, every Lammer-geier that came within sight, as one of them had carried off the child of his best friend. The name and residence of that friend having been given, he was visited, and the information imparted by him was, that a child had in reality been carried off by a Lammer-geier-not one of his children, as had been erroneously stated, but the child of an innkeeper residing some fifteen miles distant. On visiting the innkeeper, it was ascertained that the story was wholly without foundation in fact.
The Sea Eagle is a coward. The present writer once climbed to an Eagle's nest on a lofty yellow pine tree, standing near the bank of a small creek, in the northern part of the State of New York. During the progress of the climbing, the old Eagle flew about the tree, screaming and making a hissing sound, but keeping at a respectful distance from the climber. On reaching the nest, it was found to consist of a large pile of sticks, cornstalks, rushes, and some fibrous materials. The different layers showed that it had answered a similar purpose for several successive years. It contained two young Eagles that threw themselves at once upon their backs and showed fight when they saw their visitor looking at them, striking at him with their claws, making a peculiar rattling with their beaks, opening them, and suddenly shutting them with a snap. Not even when their young were lifted out of the nest and examined, did the old Eagles venture to attack the intruder, though they sometimes came toward him in a direct line, with open beaks, with their head feathers all erect, and seemingly in a terrible rage. But when within four or five yards of the object of their fury, they suddenly turned off at a right angle, either to the right or left. After the young Eagles had been examined for a quarter of an hour, they were put back into the nest, and their visitor descended the tree, to the great relief of their afflicted and fussy parents.


Buyer pays $5.00 postage & handling in US, plus USPS insurance.
VA residents add 5% sales tax to selling price.


Price= $45.00




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